Christmas safety tips for your pet dog

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20 November 2015
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With this in mind, what steps can you take to ensure that your dog remains safe from harm during the Christmas period and that they enjoy it just as much as you?

The Christmas Tree

Purchasing and decorating a Christmas tree in your home is a big part of celebrating this wonderful time of year. However, did you know that real trees can cause your dog irritation due to the mildly toxic oils contained within them?

To avoid this becoming a problem for your pet, you can purchase a smaller tree and raise it off the floor, or alternatively opt for a fake tree.

If you're leaving the house, don't forget to keep your dog out of the room where your tree is located to avoid injury while you're away.

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Pine Needles

If you decide to purchase a real Christmas tree, just remember that the pine needles are another potential hazard to your pet dog.

The needles that fall from the tree can get stuck in your pet's paws, as well as their throat, which could lead to an emergency dash to the vet's on the big day.

If you're adamant that you want a real tree, you could always block off one section of the room with barricades to keep your tree away from your pet.

Decorations

Dogs love to chew on all sorts of items around the home and your Christmas decorations are no exception.

Place lightweight and delicate baubles out of reach, high up on the tree, so that your dog can't bite through them and damage their mouth and teeth.

Any hanging items, such as tinsel and ribbons, should also be placed high enough so that your pet can't strangle themselves or get caught up in the cords.

Other potential hazards include scented oils and candles, which can cause spills and burns, as well as floral arrangements including holly and mistletoe, which can cause stomach problems if digested.

Festive Foods

We all love to tuck into a tasty meal, treats and sweets during Christmas, but remember that certain foods aren't good for your dog to consume.

Foods such as chocolate, grapes, raisins, sultanas, onion and alcohol can be damaging to your pet's health, so keep these away from your dog at all times.

Be cautious of food that's left on kitchen surfaces or food that falls from your plate whilst you're eating.

Cover up any leftovers on work surfaces and push them towards the back of the worktop so that they're well out of reach.

Remember you can always feed your pet their normal dinner or some dog treats of their own if you're feeling extra festive.

Presents

Of course, Christmas wouldn't feel right without the exchange of a few gifts between family members and loved ones. But remember, presents left around the home are just as intriguing to dogs as they are to humans.

Electronic gifts can contain batteries which, if your dog chews through them, can cause chemical burns in your dog's airways and mouth.

Small gifts can also become lodged in their throat, so be cautious and always store gifts in a safe location before they're ready to be opened.

Keep Your Dog Safe

Christmas is a fun time for the whole family but be sure to take extra precaution this year so that your dog remains safe and out of harm's way.

By following the above advice, you and your family will be able to relax, eat, drink and share some great moments together – and with your dog too.

So keep your pet safe and enjoy the festive season!

This post was written by Jack Titmuss from GJW Titmuss a leading online pet supplies, food and accessories store.