The North York Moors National Park


Visitors to the North York Moors National Park will be able to enjoy extensive stunning views over delightful dales and forests.

The vast moorland plateau was designated as a national park in 1952. It covers 1,436 square km (554 square miles). The moors are divided by dales, some of which are wide and grassy with stone walls; others are narrow and wooded. To the east the dramatic and picturesque North Yorkshire and Cleveland Heritage Coast forms 26 miles of the park’s boundary.

Heartbeat country

The North York Moors was the backdrop to ITV1’s popular police drama series ‘Heartbeat’. Set in the 1960s, the show revolves around the work and lives of a group of police officers in the fictional places of Ashfordly and Aidensfield. The series is mainly filmed in the real-life village of Goathland near Whitby in the North York Moors.

Fascinating facts
  • When Christianity arrived in Britain, wayside crosses were constructed to guide travellers. More than 30 stone crosses are scattered across the moors. One of these, Ralph’s Cross, is seen at Rosedale Head and has been adopted as the motif for the North York Moors National Park.
  • The Cleveland Way is a long distance footpath, 290km/108 miles long. It is marked with an acorn symbol. It starts at Helmsley and follows the western and northern edges of the North York Moors before reaching the coast and then continuing along it.
  • Contrary to popular belief the moors are not a natural landscape. They are the product of hundreds of years of woodland clearances, careful management, and the relentless nibbling of countless woolly jaws. Sheep suppress the scrub that constantly tries to invade the area. The national park is home to a wealth of wildlife. Listen for the evocative call of the curlew as you walk the moors. You are also likely to see golden and green plovers.
  • More than 2,000km/1,300 miles of footpaths and bridleways are cared for by the national park and you can walk even the quietest corner of the moors.